Dead Finless Porpoise Off Shek O

A locally-rare finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides) was found dead in the waters off Shek O, last week (19th November 2015).

The adult female finless porpoise was discovered on Wednesday at Tai Long Pai, bringing the total number of cetacean strandings this year up to 35. It measured 162 centimetres in length and was already severely decomposed. Dissection revealed a fishing rod in its stomach, but the cause of death is still unknown.

Marine Police received information that the corpse of a finless porpoise had been spotted floating near Shek O. The porpoise was then collected and brought to Marine Police Regional Headquarters at Sai Wan Ho, where Ocean Park Conservation Foundation’s Cetacean Stranding Response Team took on the cadaver for autopsy.

Elsewhere in China the Global Times reports another finless porpoise washed up dead in Poyang Lake in Jiangxi Province. Poyang Lake is a freshwater lake which along with the Dongting Lake is host to an estimated 500 finless porpoises. This stranding brings the total for Poyang Lake for 2015 to 5.

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Dead Green Turtle Found with Plastic in Stomach

A green turtle (Chelonia mydas) was found dead in Sai Kung over the weekend, apparently after ingesting too much trash.
Click here for the Coastal Watch HK Facebook page with images of the turtle.

On Saturday (24 Oct), the lifeless body of a green turtle was spotted on a beach at Pak Lap village, Ming Pao Daily reported.

The turtle’s body was said to have been dragged by stray dogs and its stomach mauled. An examination revealed that the stomach was full of litter.

The trash found inside the turtle, which was about 40-50 centimeters long, included nylon string and plastic bags.

It was the first time that evidence has been found in Hong Kong of green turtles consuming marine litter the report cited the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) as saying.

After looking at the pictures of the turtle’s body, Chong Dee-hwa, the founder of the Hong Kong Ichthyological Society, believes the green turtle was a female aged around 10 years.

Patrick Yeung, project manager of the Coastal Watch Project under the WWF, said the case can be taken as evidence that sea turtles in Hong Kong are eating a lot of trash, which is a worrying situation.

The Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department was quoted as saying that it has been informed about the case and that it will send an officer to look into the matter.

The green turtle is a protected species in Hong Kong. The beach area in Sham Wan on Lamma Island and nearby shallow waters is one of the last nesting sites of the highly endangered green turtles of southern China.

Since 1999, the area was being closed to the public from June to October every year to enable the turtles to carry out their nesting activities.