Dramatic Images of Shenzhen Red Tide

The Shanghaiist (Nov 26, 2014) reports that on Monday (24/11/2014), guests at the Dameisha Sheraton Resort in Shenzhen were witness to a red tide, as the sea water at the nearby beach turned a deep pink color, stretching for hundreds of meters. Dameisha is located in Mirs Bay just a few kilometres to the northeast of Hong Kong
According to the Shenzhen Marine Environment and Resources Monitoring Center, the red tide in this instance resulted from a non-toxic, algal bloom. However, despite center’s insistence that the bizarrely coloured water is harmless, a restriction on swimming and direct contact with the water has been advised.
This is not the first, and probably not the last, case of strangely colored water appearing in China.

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The red tide cause was identified as the non-toxic plankton species Karenia brevis (according to this article). Aerial photographs printed by the daily mail show the extent of the bloom. Only two problems: 1) Karenia brevis is native to the Gulf of Mexico, 2) it is toxic. In fact HK AFCD does not even list this species in its red tide database, which would be odd since it has been monitoring red tides in Hong Kong waters for over 20 years…
So once again a tabloid (the UK’s Daily Mail) has not done its research properly.

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Red Tide Sighting at Mirs Bay and Tung Ping Chau Marine Park

AFCD Press Release

Red tide sighted
Friday, August 10, 2012A red tide was sighted in Hong Kong waters over the past week, an inter-departmental red tide working group reported today (August 10).

Staff of the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department (AFCD) sighted the red tide at Mirs Bay and Tung Ping Chau Marine Park on August 6. The red tide dissipated yesterday (August 9). No associated death of fish has been reported by mariculturists so far.

“The red tide was formed by Scrippsiella trochoidea, which is common in Hong Kong waters and non-toxic,” a spokesman for the working group said.

The AFCD urged mariculturists at Sha Tau Kok, Ap Chau, Kat O, O Pui Tong, Sai Lau Kong, Tap Mun, Kau Lau Wan and Sham Wan to monitor the situation closely.

Red tide is a natural phenomenon. The AFCD’s proactive phytoplankton monitoring programme will continue monitoring red tide occurrences to minimise the impact on the mariculture industry and the public.

Ends

For the original article click here.

Red Tide Sighting at Tolo Harbour

AFCD Press Release 3rd August 2012

Red tide sighted
Friday, August 3, 2012 – A red tide was sighted in Hong Kong waters today (August 3), an inter-departmental red tide working group reported.Staff of the Leisure and Cultural Services Department and Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department (AFCD) sighted the red tide at Tolo Harbour, including the Yim Tin Tsai and Yim Tin Tsai (East) Fish Culture Zones. It still persists. No associated death of fish has been reported by mariculturists so far.

“The red tide was formed by Scrippsiella trochoidea, which is common in Hong Kong waters and non-toxic,” a spokesman for the working group said.

The AFCD urged mariculturists at Yim Tin Tsai, Yim Tin Tsai (East), Yung Shue Au and Lo Fu Wat to monitor the situation closely.

Red tide is a natural phenomenon. The AFCD’s proactive phytoplankton monitoring programme will continue monitoring red tide occurrences to minimise the impact on the mariculture industry and the public.

Original AFCD Website Press Releas

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